On the Importance of Strong Female Characters | Devon L. Miller

Trust Me, I'm a Writer

sfc-heading-pic From the Women’s March; Seattle, WA; January 21, 2017

I was fortunate enough to attend the Women’s March on Seattle, a sister to the Women’s March on Washington DC. Before I lose you, I have no intention of talking politics in this post. What I am going to talk about is something I can’t believe is still controversial: the importance of strong female characters in fiction.

As I marched with 175,000 other humans (the estimate at the time of this writing), I noticed countless signs referencing some of my favorite female badasses from fiction. I took in multiple nods to space rebels, vampire slayers, and warrior princesses and knew—without a doubt—that every last person who argues that female heroes aren’t interesting or “won’t sell” is absolutely full of shit. I saw little girls in Wonder Woman costumes and Princess/General Leia t-shirts (I was wearing a General Leia shirt myself), and knew—without…

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Trying to Write as a Pantser | Shannon A. Thompson

Shannon A Thompson

I’m a pantser for the first time.

What’s a pantser? Someone who writes a book with no plan, as opposed to a plotter, who, you know, plots.

Normally, I plot like crazy. I have plots for my plots. (Also known as subplots.) And though I almost always deviate from my original plans, I always have a plan. But lately, I was feeling a little bogged down by all that planning. I yearned for adventure. For mystery. For absolute chaos. Like a road trip with no destination ahead. Just me and the road and whatever will happen.

So, I decided my first book of 2017 would be written in perfect pantser style, full speed ahead.

I’m not going to lie, I thought I would crash and burn. In fact, I expected to. But that wasn’t the case. Let me explain the differences by comparing my normal plotter ways and my current…

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Lifebook 14 | Goodbye, Grandma

My maternal grandma, my last living biological grandparent, is gone. She died yesterday, January 12, 2017, in her sleep. It was a good life at nearly 95 years, despite all the hurdles she’d faced pretty much her entire life. Now she can rest in peaces, forever without worry.

Journal Juice 1 | Overcast

A classic that begs for re-blogging every Autumn/Winter. This was referenced in today’s Daybook 9 | Sunless post earlier.

Rucker | Writer

Overcast 1

The persistent overcast of our Midwestern autumn sky is nothing short of an adversary. Its stunning monochrome of colorless oppression aims to maim the ability to ascend above an intermediate outlook. Optimism becomes elusive and joy seems just as ethereal. It’s days on end this time of year and the overcast is stubbornly unyielding as if it has waged a personal vendetta upon the soul, the inner being which craves for that glorious candescence during daylight hours. It is only below and within that transient yet nurturing light that a body can thrive and flourish, and be with sound mind and intentions. An opaque and sunless sky is really no sky at all when one regards it like a canopy of restriction. In my wayward mind I imagine this to be akin to a forsaken locale under a dome. Which is to mean that I am effectively an insect trapped in…

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Daybook 9 | Sunless

According to the weather app on my phone yesterday, we are in for a long stretch of virtually sunless cloudy-covered days here. A stunning monochromatic overcast threatens to oppress all that exist below it. Such is Winter in the U.S. Midwest, which I suspect perhaps mimics that of the United Kingdom, the way you hear them tell it. Ugh! What a miserable backdrop for anyone’s existence.

This reminds me of what I wrote in the first ever Journal Juice entry called “Overcast” on December 9, 2014.

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