The Novelling Month Approaches — The Writing Tree

We’re already over halfway through September, which means November is fast approaching. For many writers, November means Nanowrimo, the annual challenge to write a novel in just one month. This blog post gives you some tips to help you make the most of the month, and improve your chances of success. Is Nanowrimo for you? […] … Continue reading The Novelling Month Approaches — The Writing Tree

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Why Writers Shouldn’t Blog Too Much | Vincent Mars

Blogging can take over your writing life. You may have reached a point where you have to ask yourself this question — is blogging distracting me from my more ambitious work? Many of us have started our blogs thinking it’s good for our writing careers. We need more than good writing if we want to be … Continue reading Why Writers Shouldn’t Blog Too Much | Vincent Mars

Talking Trilogies with Tony Riches | Guest Blogger for Jennifer Macaire

For most writers, completing one book would seem more than enough of an achievement, so why would anyone make a commitment to writing three? I was reading Conn Iggulden’s impressive Wars of the Roses trilogy, when the answer occurred to me. Read more at: Guest blogger, Tony Riches — Jennifer Macaire

Fight Club’s Chuck Palahniuk Explains His Writing Method With A Disturbing Story | Lowlife Magazine

https://www.youtube.com/embed/cKE3KCMwyhc?version=3&rel=1&fs=1&autohide=2&showsearch=0&showinfo=1&iv_load_policy=1&start=69&wmode=transparent (Warning: Strong/graphic content) As part of the Q&A Podcast Fight Club 15th Anniversary Special, in which host Jeff Goldsmith sat down with novelist Chuck Palahniuk (Choke, Survivor) and screenwriter Jim Uhls (Jumper) to talk about the 1999 film, Palahniuk was asked, among other things, about his writing method, including his inspirations, habits, etc. In … Continue reading Fight Club’s Chuck Palahniuk Explains His Writing Method With A Disturbing Story | Lowlife Magazine

History in fiction | Jennifer Macaire

A blogger friend not long ago published a post about writing notes for historical novels. It’s a good idea, and got me thinking about making some for my books, the time travel saga set in ancient Greece and Persia. On the other hand, I don’t want to pretend that my books are scholarly or academic … Continue reading History in fiction | Jennifer Macaire

The Month in Mixtapes: February 2017 | Bandcamp Daily

From lo-fi beat workouts to an economical eight-track survey of trap aesthetics, this is the month in mixtapes. via The Month in Mixtapes: February 2017 — Bandcamp Daily

What Happens When We Judge a Book by Its Cover? | Kristen Twardowski

Kristen Twardowski

Neverwhere and Enclave Rankings.PNG

People usually respond in one of two ways to the phenomenon of judging a book by its cover; they mourn man’s shallowness, or they consider a book’s marketing potential. But how much does the look of a book matter? How do people feel about book covers? And how do those feelings relate to the scores that books receive on review sites like Goodreads? Several digital technology people went on a mission to find out.

A year and a half ago Dean Casalena and Nate Gagnon launched Judgey, an online game that let people rank book covers. The covers used were all modern editions of books, and all (or nearly all) of them were released by a major publishing house. The covers chosen did not belong to a single genre. Books by Ernest Hemingway and Harper Lee appeared alongside Twilight and The Hunger Games. Ultimately players of Judgey evaluated over 3 million…

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