Why Writers Shouldn’t Blog Too Much | Vincent Mars

Blog, Guest Blog, Reblog

Blogging can take over your writing life. You may have reached a point where you have to ask yourself this question — is blogging distracting me from my more ambitious work?

Many of us have started our blogs thinking it’s good for our writing careers. We need more than good writing if we want to be writers, we know. We need the exposure that a blog can bring us. We need an online reputation. We need connections. Blogging can help bring us all of these.

But every minute you spend writing a blog post or reading comments is a minute you don’t spend working on your larger writing projects. And there will be many days when blogging will seem so much easier than revising that long manuscript you’ve been working on for years.

READ MORE via Why Writers Shouldn’t Blog Too Much — boy with a hat

Talking Trilogies with Tony Riches | Guest Blogger for Jennifer Macaire

Blog, Guest Blog, Reblog, Writing

For most writers, completing one book would seem more than enough of an achievement, so why would anyone make a commitment to writing three? I was reading Conn Iggulden’s impressive Wars of the Roses trilogy, when the answer occurred to me.

Read more at: Guest blogger, Tony Riches — Jennifer Macaire

Fight Club’s Chuck Palahniuk Explains His Writing Method With A Disturbing Story | Lowlife Magazine

Blog, Guest Blog, Linkage, Reblog, Video

(Warning: Strong/graphic content) As part of the Q&A Podcast Fight Club 15th Anniversary Special, in which host Jeff Goldsmith sat down with novelist Chuck Palahniuk (Choke, Survivor) and screenwriter Jim Uhls (Jumper) to talk about the 1999 film, Palahniuk was asked, among other things, about his writing method, including his inspirations, habits, etc. In response, he proceeded […]

via (For Those Looking To Write Transgressive Fiction), Fight Club’s Chuck Palahniuk Explains His Writing Method With A Disturbing Story — LOWLIFE MAGAZINE

History in fiction | Jennifer Macaire

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A blogger friend not long ago published a post about writing notes for historical novels. It’s a good idea, and got me thinking about making some for my books, the time travel saga set in ancient Greece and Persia. On the other hand, I don’t want to pretend that my books are scholarly or academic – they are fiction, and even if I did research for years before and during writing, I can’t say they are strictly historical. I took too many liberties. So, if I did include historical notes, they would be more to explain where and why I changed things around and not to tell what really happened.

I always thought that a historical fiction writer has to walk a fine line between facts and fiction. I used several sources for my tales, including Arrian’s Anabasis of Alexander, which one can now find online in its entirety.  Arrian lived approximately 500 years after Alexander’s death and he mostly used writings from Aristobulus, a historian who accompanied Alexander on his journey; Nearchus, Alexander’s admiral, and Ptolemy Lagos. Unfortunately, those writings have largely disappeared and there is hardly anything left that is contemporary of Alexander.  While I was writing, I contacted a professor in Italy, who very kindly advised me on some questions I had, including names and where to look for recipes for toothpaste. A surgeon was very helpful in explaining some of the operations and medical skills of the times, and told me that there weren’t any sutures in ancient times – these appeared late in the 18th century.  And finally, Michael Wood’s book, In the Footsteps of Alexander was my constant companion to trace Alexander’s voyage. [more]

From History in fictionhttp://wp.me/p6bgv3-1XZ

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The Month in Mixtapes: February 2017 | Bandcamp Daily

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From lo-fi beat workouts to an economical eight-track survey of trap aesthetics, this is the month in mixtapes.

via The Month in Mixtapes: February 2017 — Bandcamp Daily

What Happens When We Judge a Book by Its Cover? | Kristen Twardowski

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Kristen Twardowski

Neverwhere and Enclave Rankings.PNG

People usually respond in one of two ways to the phenomenon of judging a book by its cover; they mourn man’s shallowness, or they consider a book’s marketing potential. But how much does the look of a book matter? How do people feel about book covers? And how do those feelings relate to the scores that books receive on review sites like Goodreads? Several digital technology people went on a mission to find out.

A year and a half ago Dean Casalena and Nate Gagnon launched Judgey, an online game that let people rank book covers. The covers used were all modern editions of books, and all (or nearly all) of them were released by a major publishing house. The covers chosen did not belong to a single genre. Books by Ernest Hemingway and Harper Lee appeared alongside Twilight and The Hunger Games. Ultimately players of Judgey evaluated over 3 million…

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On Love and Letters: Writing for Those You Know | Kristen Twardowski

Guest Blog, Reblog

Though I write with terrifying frequency, I fail at an essential type of writing; letters make me fumble. They cause me to be tongue-tied and stuttery. Cards that I give to friends and family are inevitably filled with long spaces and smudges where I have paused to think or where I have decided that […]

via On Love and Letters: Writing for Those You Know — Kristen Twardowski