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Reset

sunlight through trees
Photo by Micah Hallahan

Every morning. Without fail. The reset. For me it’s almost like a complete reboot because the internal processor that is my brain does this total cache-ing of whatever negative energy or static was effecting me by the previous day’s end. Thus, mentally and emotionally (maybe not physically as I am a middle-aged man) I awake completely refreshed, happy-go-lucky and with a positive mindset for the day and very little-to-no nasty residue from the day before. This can be annoying (sometimes I’d like to hold on to that intense energy from the day before) but I can’t deny that it’s a good thing too. Comes in real handy if you need to apologize the next day for how you acted the day before, or on the flip side of that, be more receptive to the mea culpas of others.

By nature I’m not what one would call “a morning person” because I always (well, used to) stay up late and I’m not exactly anxious to rise early to go to work, but in the last couple of years as I’ve eased into middle-age (and have a weekday grind that starts a 8 AM) I’ve found that even when I don’t need to rise early on weekends and days off that I’ve been rising well before my preferred 10 o’ clock rising time of the good ol’ days (of course that may have something to do with my falling asleep earlier than planned like some old man). This earlier awakening  happens by default now but I appreciate it because as a sunshine kid I do like to enjoy as much of the daylight hours as possible as well as those ‘quiet hours’ in my house as they’re perfect for thinking, reading and writing without distraction and interruption. The universe knows my eternal struggle with distractions.

Anyway, good morning to the two or three of you reading this after it posts. I am reset for this glorious new day! Here’s hoping it’s not downhill from here. I need tea.

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Quotes

Warren Ellis on Commercial Storytelling

I am a proud and eager subscriber of writer Warren Ellis’ weekly newsletter Oribital Operations.  On a weekly basis (or therabouts) I can expect him to touch upon various topics that run the gamut of intelligent, thought-provoking, humorous and enlightening. A couple of weeks ago he stated something that really stopped me in my tracks, something I feel I must share with other writers.

“. . .thoughts about how commercial storytelling is changing. Look at the ructions television has gone through in the last fifteen years. The “endless” run (and the end brought by economics as much as anything) looks like an aged form now, and novels for television are where the important stuff is done. TRUE DETECTIVE, and the even more innovative AMERICAN HORROR STORY (and now AMERICAN CRIME) where the cast are a stable putting on a new play every season.

I think Jeff VanderMeer’s interlocking SOUTHERN REACH novels, all three released in the same 12 months, might prove to be a very interesting model for prose.

But it’s also a set of thoughts — and I haven’t nailed this down, I’m going to come back to it — about how narrative forms need to keep moving at the pace of the world to some extent, need to keep looking for new sounds. Also, going back to earlier scenes and digging through their rubble for something that can be mutated and gene-edited in a lab and bolted on to something else in order to make something modern. It’s not looking backward when you’re constructing something new out of the parts. Frankenstein wasn’t an archaeologist.

Keep building. Keep shooting lightning into things to see what happens. That’s what the narrative enterprise needs. That’s been my constant aspiration.”

— Warren Ellis via Orbital Operations. Who also writes most mornings (on British Summer Time) at Morning, Computer.

Warren Ellis
Photograph shot and copyright by Ellen J. Rogers