The Merc with a Mouth in a Movie | Thoughts on the Deadpool flick

https://i0.wp.com/s3.foxfilm.com/foxmovies/production/films/103/images/posters/464-film-page-large.jpgFor an action movie with a foulmouthed blabbermouth antihero, it’s pretty good. The opening sequence let’s you know right away (and any parents who may have foolishly brought their little ones expecting Spider-Man, Iron Man or Captain America fare) what the nature of this movie is going to be about and what kind of content you can expect. The opening credits laced throughout that first sequence are written in Deadpool’s unique perspective, which also informs the flavor of this raucous, ultra-violent movie. Right away we see Deadpool doing what he does best, delivering graphic and gruesome punishment to bad(der) guys, all the while quickly rolling off a litany of witty, wisecracking one-liners off his swift tongue for all the chuckles, usually in voice-over or while looking right at us, breaking the fourth wall. The camera angles in these first few sequences are daring for great comedic effect.  You come to realize without a doubt during this first zippy action sequence that that Ryan Reynolds is the ideal actor for Deadpool.

Storywise, I think my favorite aspect was the choice to go non-linear with the narrative. I’ve preferred in-media res (starting in the middle) storytelling since I was a teenager first studying the art and craft of fiction. I think most of us prefer the immediacy of what’s happening now to start things off before we get into the why and how of it. At this point it’s become the formula for these kinds of movies and I’m good with that, all things considered. Since this is Deadpool’s first solo outing, it’s ultimately an origin movie.

So just as we’re getting into the rising action, the narrative shifts right at the perfect time to Deadpool’s past as Saskatchewan, Canada’s own Wade Wilson, an ex-Special Forces operative now working as a mercenary who’s just bad enough to kill the even worse guys who deserve it when the job calls for it.  These narrative flashback sequences – merged seamlessly with the present-time narrative – offer us what is effectively a love story, and a potentially tragic romance, which is my favorite kind. The pleasant surprise comes in the arrival of the always wonderful and oh-so-lovely Morena Baccarin as his lady love, Vanessa. As lovers ,Wade and Vanessa have that perfect — if unlikely and rare —  connection where their past psychological baggage is nearly equal in bleakness and volume, and they also just totally get and complete each other.

And therein lies the typical catalyst for a Marvel comics character: love, or the loss of it, is the main impetus for springing our would-be hero into action. But not before we see the events leading up to all of that – the torture at the hands of the villain Ajax (aka Francis) that brings about Deadpool’s apparently latent mutation, making him the badass ultra-healing human killing machine with an never-ending mouth to match. The Merc with a Mouth. His mission is to find and ultimately kill the bastard who made him what he is (through the ruse of curing his terminal cancer). Once the life of his lady love is seriously threatened, it’s really on. With the help of two sidekick X-Men characters in the classic Colossus and newcomer Negasonic Teenage Warhead (!),  who would rather he join their motley band of heroes, Deadpool ultimately triumphs — the ugly guy gets the girl back. The movie ultimately satisfies while not overachieving.

Since the movie’s record-breaking opening at the box office, much chatter has been made about the freedom a rated R “superhero” movie has in regards to language, sexual content and violence. In mainstream movies that aren’t exclusively adult in nature, I always say that less is more because it’s more impactful when it does occur. Deadpool is no exception, but it tries too hard to walk that edge, making some of the gags feel forced in my opinion. In effect, each timely F-bomb, witty sexual reference and gruesome dismemberment becomes overkill once they get well past the half-dozen quotient. But true blue — er — red Deadpool fans certainly won’t be bothered and will likely expect even more of the same in the imminent sequel. Hell, the studio may even go for an NC-17 just to prove the point they made with the R rating. I’m mostly kidding.

CBF Grade: B+

— Brandon L. Rucker

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The Merc with a Mouth in a Movie | Thoughts on the Deadpool flick

https://i0.wp.com/s3.foxfilm.com/foxmovies/production/films/103/images/posters/464-film-page-large.jpgOriginally posted @ Comic Book Fetish | By  Brandon L. Rucker

For an action movie with a foulmouthed blabbermouth antihero, it’s pretty good. The opening sequence let’s you know right away (and any parents who may have foolishly brought their little ones expecting Spider-Man, Iron Man or Captain America fare) what the nature of this movie is going to be about and what kind of content you can expect. The opening credits laced throughout that first sequence are written in Deadpool’s unique perspective, which also informs the flavor of this raucous, ultra-violent movie. Right away we see Deadpool doing what he does best, delivering graphic and gruesome punishment to bad(der) guys, all the while quickly rolling off a litany of witty, wisecracking one-liners off his swift tongue for all the chuckles, usually in voice-over or while looking right at us, breaking the fourth wall. The camera angles in these first few sequences are daring for great comedic effect.  You come to realize without a doubt during this first zippy action sequence that that Ryan Reynolds is the ideal actor for Deadpool.

Storywise, I think my favorite aspect was the choice to go non-linear with the narrative. I’ve preferred in-media res (starting in the middle) storytelling since I was a teenager first studying the art and craft of fiction. I think most of us prefer the immediacy of what’s happening now to start things off before we get into the why and how of it. At this point it’s become the formula for these kinds of movies and I’m good with that, all things considered. Since this is Deadpool’s first solo outing, it’s ultimately an origin movie.

So just as we’re getting into the rising action, the narrative shifts right at the perfect time to Deadpool’s past as Saskatchewan, Canada’s own Wade Wilson, an ex-Special Forces operative now working as a mercenary who’s just bad enough to kill the even worse guys who deserve it when the job calls for it.  These narrative flashback sequences – merged seamlessly with the present-time narrative – offer us what is effectively a love story, and a potentially tragic romance, which is my favorite kind. The pleasant surprise comes in the arrival of the always wonderful and oh-so-lovely Morena Baccarin as his lady love, Vanessa. As lovers ,Wade and Vanessa have that perfect — if unlikely and rare —  connection where their past psychological baggage is nearly equal in bleakness and volume, and they also just totally get and complete each other.

And therein lies the typical catalyst for a Marvel comics character: love, or the loss of it, is the main impetus for springing our would-be hero into action. But not before we see the events leading up to all of that – the torture at the hands of the villain Ajax (aka Francis) that brings about Deadpool’s apparently latent mutation, making him the badass ultra-healing human killing machine with an never-ending mouth to match. The Merc with a Mouth. His mission is to find and ultimately kill the bastard who made him what he is (through the ruse of curing his terminal cancer). Once the life of his lady love is seriously threatened, it’s really on. With the help of two sidekick X-Men characters in the classic Colossus and newcomer Negasonic Teenage Warhead (!),  who would rather he join their motley band of heroes, Deadpool ultimately triumphs — the ugly guy gets the girl back. The movie ultimately satisfies while not overachieving.

Since the movie’s record-breaking opening at the box office, much chatter has been made about the freedom a rated R “superhero” movies has in regards to language, sexual content and violence. In mainstream movies that aren’t exclusively adult in nature, I always say that less is more because it’s more impactful when it does occur. Deadpool is no exception, but it tries too hard to walk that edge, making some of the gags feel forced in my opinion. In effect, each timely F-bomb, witty sexual reference and gruesome dismemberment becomes overkill once they get well past the half-dozen quotient. But true blue — er — red Deadpool fans certainly won’t be bothered and will likely expect even more of the same in the imminent sequel. Hell, the studio may even go for an NC-17 just to prove the point they made with the R rating. I’m mostly kidding.

CBF Grade: B+

-B.

Buzz: An R-Rating for Wolverine 3?

wolverineiiirSo the big comic book movie news that went viral today was that the makers of the forthcoming Wolverine 3 (2017) movie are “targeting an R rating”, according to Comicbook.com (and plenty of other sources). My initial reaction was one, surprisingly, of conservative preservation of the status quo.

Of course this comes on the heels of the R-rated Deadpool movie having a record-breaking February opening this past weekend. You know how Hollywood works, it’s a copycat town so of course the next Wolverine movie should be rated R, right? I presented this topic to my comics and geek culture group The Comic Book Underground on Facebook today with this opening from me:

Here we go, because Hollywood is gonna Hollywood. Wolverine is an exception, I suppose, but let’s not start making every team movie the Watchmen (insert wink emoji).

And thus, ensued a spirited for it-versus-against it conversation in regards to the upcoming Wolverine movie having certain liberties that come with an R rating, copied and pasted here, unedited (because I’m lazy):

Terrence Sage This makes sense to me. It’s Logan swan song.

Joe Gardner I don’t know. Wolverine SHOULD’VE been R from the get go. But now that you’ve made him PG-13, it’s going to be hard to change that. Especially if you thought the parent backlash against Deadpool was bad.

Like · Reply · 2 · 8 hrs

Garbiel Guerrero Why bother. An R Rated Origin is what we deserved. Too late man, game over.

Like · Reply · 1 · 8 hrs

Michael Tennant There is no reason you need an R-Rating for Wolverine. None at all. Never has been. Character isn’t known for using foul language or graphic sex…violence maybe but it’s not like you cannot get by with pg13

Unlike · Reply · 2 · 8 hrs

James Lawrence I’m not sure what Wolverine you’ve been reading Michael, cussing, blood, guts and killing are all Wolverine traits IMO. The sex part no.

Like · Reply · 1 · 8 hrs

Brandon Rucker Gotta say I agree with Michael Tennant on this. To get to that rating in that kind of movie you have to be trying hard to get there which means it will be gratuitous.

Like · Reply · 1 · 8 hrs

Brandon Rucker James What cuss words has Wolverine uttered that would warrant an R rating? Or even the frequency? Because to earn an R rating merely on language you would have to be cussing like a Tarantino movie and dropping sexual references which Wolverine does not do. He’s not Deadpool.

Michael Tennant My favourite Wolverine graphic novel Blood Hungry would be hard pressed to get an r rating

James Lawrence None, because fuck, shit, piss and cunt aren’t allowed in comics. IF they were I think he’d be right up there with the top power users of those words. He’s no Captain America when it comes to foul language…LOL
Like · Reply · 2 · 8 hrs · Edited
Michael Tennant I’m no Captain America either but I do throw those words out indiscriminately

Garbiel GuerreroI think not seeing him curse is a byproduct of being such a popular line. How many times do you get “what the….” or “holy ….” just to be interrupted by a blast or building collapse. It’s Wolverine, he’s drowned his own son, he curses.

But still not needing an r rated movie.

Like · Reply · 2 · 7 hrs

Joe GardnerI’m fairly certain Wolverine would be quite violent. Especially berserker rage Wolverine. THAT would warrant an R.

Like · Reply · 1 · 5 hrs

Brandon Rucker Well the comics are the standard, right? Plus the movies so far. Again, if you want to get into the gratuitous area that the R rating allows, fine, but it will be glaring and unnecessarily showy. One utterance of fuck doesnt earn the r-rating. Several will. When has it ever been necessary for Wolverine to utter more than necessary? He’s not a fucking sailor. Also, I’ve never walked out of any superhero movie thinking “Damn, I wish they had cussed more and shown more blood.” Because you can have intense violence sans blood and gore on a PG-13 rating.

Like · Reply · 2 · 5 hrs

Joshua HootenDeadpool gets an R rating and now everybody wants an R rating.

Unlike · Reply · 2 · 4 hrs

James Lawrence He’s a guy that kills people with the claws attached to his hands and doesn’t think twice about it. But cursing is out of character for him…ok Boy Scout material right there…LOL He’s not Captain America or Spider-man.

I don’t need cursing or blood but it doesn’t bother me either.

Like · Reply · 1 · 3 hrs · Edited

Joe Gardner All I’m saying is, if they would have started with an R, this would make sense. And you could’ve justified Wolverine with an R. Not vulgar like Deadpool, but still. And I’ve enjoyed the two movies, so the R isn’t necessary. But now that you’ve made two PG-13 movies, you’ll have a hard sell to make the third R.

Brandon Rucker James it’s not about it being a bother, it’s about whether or not it’s necessary. The possibility comes up and y’all lose your minds with need like we just gotta have it.. My opinion is we’ve gone decades without it, is it really necessary to shoe-horn it in just because we can? I could jump off my roof, doesn’t mean I should or that it’s a great idea.

Like · Reply · 1 · 51 mins

James LawrenceMy only argument is that it’s 100% fitting with the character. They don’t need to shoe horn it in a final movie.

Brandon RuckerUnderstood. However the studio is “aiming for an R rating”, so, y’know. #DoinTooMuch #TryinTooHard

Like · Reply · 1 · 21 mins · Edited

Joshua HootenBrandon, if you jump off your roof, I’m going to jump off of mine, just to prove I can do it.

Brandon RuckerAnd to your point, the guy kills people with his claws and he’s been doing that successfully for how long with nary a vulgar word? Why start now LOL.

I’m open to any truly compelling arguments as to why Wolverine 3 needs or should be rated R.

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