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Fight Club’s Chuck Palahniuk Explains His Writing Method With A Disturbing Story | Lowlife Magazine

(Warning: Strong/graphic content) As part of the Q&A Podcast Fight Club 15th Anniversary Special, in which host Jeff Goldsmith sat down with novelist Chuck Palahniuk (Choke, Survivor) and screenwriter Jim Uhls (Jumper) to talk about the 1999 film, Palahniuk was asked, among other things, about his writing method, including his inspirations, habits, etc. In response, he proceeded […]

via (For Those Looking To Write Transgressive Fiction), Fight Club’s Chuck Palahniuk Explains His Writing Method With A Disturbing Story — LOWLIFE MAGAZINE

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Guest Blog – Fifty Shades of Error: Chuck Palahniuk’s BEAUTIFUL YOU

Selected Squibs, Scrips, and Essays by Joseph Suglia

IF YOU ARE AT LEAST TWENTY-EIGHT (28) YEARS OF AGE, FEEL FREE TO CLICK THE IMAGE ABOVE TO READ MY NOVEL WATCH OUT: THE FINAL VERSION!

Fifty Shades of Error: chuckpalahniuk’s BEAUTIFUL YOU
by Dr. Joseph Suglia

1.) “Even as Penny was attacked, the judge merely stared” [1].  Never begin a novel with a sentence written in the passive voice.  This sentence, in particular, sounds as if it were transliterated from Estonian or spoken by Grimace.  It contains a clumsy adverb (“merely”).  It is fatiguing to read.

2.) “The court reporter continued to dutifully keyboard, transcribing Penny’s words” [1].  Careful novelists avoid verbs such as “to continue,” “to start,” “to try,” “to remain,” and “to begin.”  Such verbs weaken sentences.

3.) “It would’ve been different if there had been other women in the courtroom, but there were none” [1].  “None” is a singular indefinite pronoun; therefore, the second independent clause…

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