Books!!!

So I’ve already burned through the Barnes & Noble gift card the in-laws gave me for X-mas. Excited to finally finish The Drifter (2016), the debut suspense novel by Nick Petrie that I started in the summer of 2016 from the library. Went ahead and grabbed his sophomore effort, Burning Bright (2017) as well.  Also grabbed The Fireman, the 2016 magnum opus by Joe Hill. From the darker side of things is The Dark Net (2017) by Benjamin Percy. And finally, from the YA section of the bookstore, Marissa Meyer’s Renegades (2017) which seems to be a kind of Dystopian teenage superhero epic of 2 books (the second book is expected sometime later this year, I believe). Given all the other books I have checked out from the library (including a lot of nonfiction) and the stack of unread comic books and graphic novels, I’d say my bookworm menu for 2018 is quite robust.

BOOKS

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Bookworm Ruckus At It Again

~ Daybook #11 ~

The picture above doesn’t do it justice (not wide enough) but it is an image of the graphic novels section at one of my local public libraries.

You know you have an incurable book fetish when you find yourself unexpectedly rummaging the shelves at the dollar store looking for unlikely gems. #AlwaysBeReading folks.

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What Happens When We Judge a Book by Its Cover? | Kristen Twardowski

Kristen Twardowski

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People usually respond in one of two ways to the phenomenon of judging a book by its cover; they mourn man’s shallowness, or they consider a book’s marketing potential. But how much does the look of a book matter? How do people feel about book covers? And how do those feelings relate to the scores that books receive on review sites like Goodreads? Several digital technology people went on a mission to find out.

A year and a half ago Dean Casalena and Nate Gagnon launched Judgey, an online game that let people rank book covers. The covers used were all modern editions of books, and all (or nearly all) of them were released by a major publishing house. The covers chosen did not belong to a single genre. Books by Ernest Hemingway and Harper Lee appeared alongside Twilight and The Hunger Games. Ultimately players of Judgey evaluated over 3 million…

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