Newsletters are cool. Subscribe to Mine?

Ruckography subscription Link: https://tinyletter.com/ruckography

*Note: Simply enter your email address in the form. Please check your junk folder/spam blocker in case the email is filtered there.

cropped-cropped-8f6df-typewriter1971ws255b2255d4.jpg


First things first.
This is not really about “Brandon Rucker News”, it’s more about connecting with other interesting people and intellectual minds, sharing our thoughts, interests, passions, gripes and ideas with each other, and more. Sure, I’m taking the lead by asking you to join me and allow me to inform and entertain you for maybe five minutes at most, but I’m also hoping to inspire you to do the same so that you can in return inform and entertain me as well, perhaps with your own series of newsletters.
But why a newsletter? Why not keep rocking the blog?

Short answer: it seems like a cool thing to do. Long answer: I’m still rocking the blog, but its contents will now be less personal and hopefully broader in scope. Yet, while the overall reach of personal blogs/websites has decreased some in recent years due to social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter, mass-mailed newsletters have made a comeback the last couple of years (primarily with the literary crowd, of course). There are a few I’m subscribed to by other writers and I’ve been inspired to finally join in activity. Could be a failed experiment, but I’m giving it a shot anyway.

I have blogged semi-regularly the past seven years, and I’ve exhausted the functionality of both Facebook and Twitter and am starting to pull back from both, and the blog some, in terms of personal content.  I’m ready to try this new experiment and fill it with personal content, sharing the kind of things I know you would appreciate receiving.

Scheduling?
I’ve no idea what frequency this will be, but bi-weekly seems to be ideal and not too much of a bother, though maybe just kind of whenever I have enough to share? Who knows what day of the week, I mean, I was born on a Wednesday, so maybe?
I Appreciate You

At any rate, I THANK YOU for lending me a few minutes of your time whenever you stop by this blog, and if you’re subscribing to the newsletter, I thank you for that as well. I always try my damnedest not to waste your time or take it for granted.

All the best,

– B.

Advertisements

Advice from Warren Ellis, Internet Jesus

In this week’s edition of his newsletter, Orbital Operations, writer of all trades and legendary Internet Jesus Warren Ellis offered the following bits of sage advice for us all to perform our own lifehack in these unprecedented times. Take heed, if you want to survive.


“If you’re on social media, make your account private, and use it to be social. Use it with your friends. 

If you rely on social media for news, do this. 1) Don’t use Facebook for news. I mean, just don’t. Facebook’s values are not your own, and they have their own rules for what you get to see. So just don’t. 2) Twitter has a function called Lists. So go to a Twitter account, press the little cog icon on the right, and select Add Or Remove From Lists. Create a list, and you can add people to it without actually following them.

The term “attention economy” seems to be making a comeback in 2017. Your attention is valuable. Also, the confusing and scattering of your attention is valuable. Overwhelming you into making bad or unfocused choices is valuable. Take back your attention.

And for god’s sake, stick a passcode on your phone this week. Six is okay, I’m told eleven is better. And turn off Touch ID before you go through an airport – that’s a thing I keep hearing.

(Addition to last week’s notes: favcleaner will wipe out your entire Twitter likes history, slowly. It will post to your account once – just delete the tweet.)

Find your news. I read The Guardian, BBC News and Foreign Policy every morning, as well as Politico and Axios daily newsletters, and I recently bought access to The Washington Post and put Reuters on my home screen.

Find your people. Do it offline. If you’re worried, turn your phone off before you leave the house to go to a meeting, and don’t turn it back on until you’re well away from the meeting place. Or leave it at home entirely, and carry a burner with a removeable battery.

Change your goddamn passwords and don’t buy any of that IoT shit.

Also, this.

“Trump administration officials are discussing the possibility of asking foreign visitors to disclose all websites and social media sites they visit, and to share the contacts in their cell phones. If the foreign visitor declines to share such information, he or she could be denied entry”

This isn’t unexpected, and the ground has already been laid for it, in the updated ESTA and in the questioning of journalists at customs in the US over their LinkedIn accounts last year.

Sorry to be such a huge downer, but these are times for protection.

Come and sit by me. I have whisky, and I like fires.”


Do yourself a favor and subscribe to the Orbital Operations newsletter here.


Warren Ellis is the award-winning writer of graphic novels like TRANSMETROPOLITAN, FELL, MINISTRY OF SPACE and PLANETARY, and the author of the NYT-bestselling GUN MACHINE and the “underground classic” novel CROOKED LITTLE VEIN, as well as the digital short-story single DEAD PIG COLLECTOR.  His newest book is the novella NORMAL, from FSG Originals.

The movie RED is based on his graphic novel of the same name, its sequel having been released in summer 2013.  IRON MAN 3 is based on his Marvel Comics graphic novel IRON MAN: EXTREMIS.   He is currently developing his graphic novel sequence with Jason Howard, TREES, for television, in concert with HardySonBaker and NBCU, and continues to work as a screenwriter and producer in film and television, represented by Angela Cheng Caplan and Cheng Caplan Company.

He’s written extensively for VICE, WIRED UK and Reuters on technological and cultural matters, and given keynote speeches and lectures at events like dConstruct, ThingsCon, Improving Reality, SxSW, How The Light Gets In and Cognitive Cities.

Warren Ellis is currently working on a non-fiction book about the future of the city for FSG Originals, serialising new graphic novel works like TREES and INJECTION at Image Comics, and developing and curating the revival of the Wildstorm creative library for DC Entertainment.

A documentary about his work, CAPTURED GHOSTS, was released in 2012.

Recognitions include the NUIG Literary and Debating Society’s President’s Medal for service to freedom of speech, the EAGLE AWARDS Roll Of Honour for lifetime achievement in the field of comics & graphic novels, the Grand Prix de l’Imaginaire 2010, the Sidewise Award for Alternate History and the International Horror Guild Award for illustrated narrative.  He is a Patron of the British Humanist Association, an Associate of the Institute of Atemporal Studies, and the literary editor of EDICT magazine.

Warren Ellis lives outside London, on the south-east coast of England, in case he needs to make a quick getaway.

8551231835_3c4c9ec04a_o1

via Warrenellis.com

“Sultan’s Curse” – New Music from Mastodon | Earworm of the Week

In high anticipation of their next new studio album Emperor of Sand (out March 31st), my favorite modern metal band Mastodon offered up this pre-release single last week that has wormed and embedded itself deep within my subconscious. As the title alludes, the forthcoming concept album is thematically based on time and death, inspired by cancer, the silent killer that has touched the band the past year and a half in two different instances.

Key lyric in this one: Memories of loved ones are passing me by.

Enjoy.

 

On the Importance of Strong Female Characters | Devon L. Miller

Trust Me, I'm a Writer

sfc-heading-pic From the Women’s March; Seattle, WA; January 21, 2017

I was fortunate enough to attend the Women’s March on Seattle, a sister to the Women’s March on Washington DC. Before I lose you, I have no intention of talking politics in this post. What I am going to talk about is something I can’t believe is still controversial: the importance of strong female characters in fiction.

As I marched with 175,000 other humans (the estimate at the time of this writing), I noticed countless signs referencing some of my favorite female badasses from fiction. I took in multiple nods to space rebels, vampire slayers, and warrior princesses and knew—without a doubt—that every last person who argues that female heroes aren’t interesting or “won’t sell” is absolutely full of shit. I saw little girls in Wonder Woman costumes and Princess/General Leia t-shirts (I was wearing a General Leia shirt myself), and knew—without…

View original post 544 more words

Trying to Write as a Pantser | Shannon A. Thompson

Shannon A Thompson

I’m a pantser for the first time.

What’s a pantser? Someone who writes a book with no plan, as opposed to a plotter, who, you know, plots.

Normally, I plot like crazy. I have plots for my plots. (Also known as subplots.) And though I almost always deviate from my original plans, I always have a plan. But lately, I was feeling a little bogged down by all that planning. I yearned for adventure. For mystery. For absolute chaos. Like a road trip with no destination ahead. Just me and the road and whatever will happen.

So, I decided my first book of 2017 would be written in perfect pantser style, full speed ahead.

I’m not going to lie, I thought I would crash and burn. In fact, I expected to. But that wasn’t the case. Let me explain the differences by comparing my normal plotter ways and my current…

View original post 689 more words